Tanzania, United Rep of

Multiple Benefits of DRR cover page

This policy brief highlights how investing in disaster risk reduction not only protects lives and assets, but can also yield additional benefits that can enhance the wellbeing and resilience of African countries. Under the program, “Building Disaster

Tanzania cover page

This report analyses public investment planning for disaster risk reduction (DRR) in Tanzania and highlights the level of public investment in DRR in the country. It does this through a risk-sensitive budget review (RSBR), which uses the Organisation for

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United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction - Regional Office for Africa
Centro Internazionale in Monitoraggio Ambientale
Dodoma

Within the Programme “Building Disaster Resilience to Natural Hazards in Sub-Saharan African Regions, Countries and Communities ”, UNDRR and CIMA Research Foundation organized a five-day Study Tour in Europe – namely Italy and Brussels - for members of

Disaster risk management officials from Africa visited the European Response Coordination Centre this week in Brussels
Disaster risk management officials had an opportunity to meet counterparts in Europe this week and exchange experiences supported by the European Union.

The data required for assessing disaster risk can generally be divided into three categories: hazard, exposure and vulnerability. To date there is no widely accepted approach for storing and sharing such risk-related data using a common data structure. As

The impacts of natural hazards in the form of floods are severe, and lifeline systems such as water supply are at risk. Tanzania is no exclusion to this risk. A 30” water transmission main in Dar es Salaam was broken and dragged away following recent

This Tanzania country risk profile provides a comprehensive view of hazard, risk and uncertainties for floods and droughts in a changing climate, with projections for the period 2050-2100. The risk profile considers a large number of possible scenarios

Children in class in Ketumbeine community in north-eastern Tanzania (c) World Vision
Following a deadly and disruptive earthquake in September 2016, authorities in Tanzania have embarked on a project to engage school children in community disaster preparedness as part of their Education in Emergency initiative.
The dry and arid region of Isiola in Kenya where droughts are recurrent. Photo ©EU/ECHO/Martin Karimi
The United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction has engaged CIMA Research Foundation to generate risk profiles on flood and drought in 16 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. The countries that will be involved in the risk assessment are: Angola, Equatorial Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Rwanda, Swaziland, Tanzania, Ivory Coast, Botswana, Zambia, Namibia, Gambia, Gabon, Cameroon, Ghana, Sao Tome and Principe, and Kenya.