Asia

MCR2030  Asia Pacific webinar photo
Over the last 20 years, disasters in Asia-Pacific have become more numerous and expensive, and cities are where the impacts of these disasters are most acutely felt. Climate change is one large driver of risk, but urbanization and the increase in
Asia Pacific climate week banner image
As the most disaster-prone region, the Asia-Pacific Climate Week (APCW) 2021 wrapped up on Friday 9 July with a strong recognition of the region’s potential to lead on resilience building against the impacts of climate change in conjunction with an increased commitment to shift to low-carbon economies.
Speaker in the future thinking webinar
To develop and enhance resilience, the best way forward is to create a system that helps us anticipate and identify different future possibilities and helps to navigate the challenges and uncertainties of today. In support of this approach, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Regional Science Bureau for Asia and the Pacific, Jakarta; the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR) Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, Bangkok; the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Accelerator Lab – Indonesia; and youth alliance group, U-INSPIRE Alliance organized a webinar on disaster risk reduction to discuss new ways of mitigating future crises and disasters.
Cover image for China story
China announced that it has reduced by half its disaster-related mortality over five years thanks to the adoption of a disaster prevention-centred approach, and is seeking to strengthen international cooperation around disaster risk reduction with countries around the world.
Counting Women cover

This brief summarizes the main recommendations and key points from the 29 April 2021 side event, Counting Women: using disaggregated data to build a resilient and inclusive Blue Pacific Continent, at the 14th Triennial Conference of Pacific Women.

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Panelists of the side event
Suva – Producing and using disaggregated disaster and climate data is vital to build a resilient Blue Pacific that includes some of the region’s most vulnerable populations. This was the headline call from female leaders representing different sectors to
26 March Side Event
2020 was an unprecedented year for the Asia-Pacific region with the COVID-19 pandemic compounded by a succession of climate-related disasters, threatening to derail decades of hard-earned socio-economic progress. Many countries in the region now face
SDG13 Web Story
At the 2021 Asia Pacific Sustainable Development Forum, representatives from Asia Pacific governments, civil society, academia, and the private sector came together in a virtual roundtable discussion convened by UN ESCAP, with support from UNDRR and other
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For countries in Asia-Pacific graduating from least-developed category, the COVID-19 pandemic has added a new dimension to their risk levels, worsening the impacts of multiple crises, exacerbating inequalities and threatening to roll-back progress against
SRSG quote for IWD
The United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR) Women’s International Network for Disaster Risk Reduction (WIN DRR), UN Women and UNDRR’s Regional Office for Asia and Pacific hosted an online discussion with some of the Asia-Pacific region's most accomplished women in the field. The event distilled decades of experience in governance and resilience building into a dialogue about the ways in which women’s leadership has reduced disaster risk, and how these lessons can shape a more equal post-pandemic future.